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International Health Insurance for Overseas Travel

Since most business travel involves international travel, the insurance benefits that apply to domestic travel are likely to be significantly different from those applicable to international travel. You should not assume that the business insurance benefits provided in a domestic policy cover international travel.

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International Health Insurance for Overseas Travel

Since most business travel involves international travel, the insurance benefits that apply to domestic travel are likely to be significantly different from those applicable to international travel. You should not assume that the business insurance benefits provided in a domestic policy cover international travel. Therefore, you should carefully consider the specifics of your business travel insurance policy, which you should carefully review annually and every time you make a trip.

Critical Illness Protection

Critical illness insurance covers out-of-pocket expenses related to specific types of medical conditions, such as cancer, HIV, and several types of infectious diseases.

Dre may refer to:

The Medicare Benefit Cut Off, on which Medicare Part B premium and/or Part D premium depend

A claimant may apply for coverage under the critical illness benefit, but is not automatically enrolled in coverage.

Who Qualifies for Medicare Coverage

Every eligible American who is at least 65 years old.

Effective January 1, 2018, enrollees who are of retirement age or older.

Participation in Medicare and Part A and Part B.

Part B, Part D and the Medicare Advantage program.

You should consult with your local Medicare office to learn about the coverage you qualify for.

Other Medicare Benefits and Types of Coverage

Medicare Part A covers a certain percentage of the cost of inpatient hospital and skilled nursing facility services for up to 100 days after you enter the hospital.

Part B covers services received in a Medicare-approved long-term care facility.

Medicare Part C provides prescription drug coverage. If you purchase prescription drug coverage through a Medicare Advantage Plan, you must include the Part C prescription drug benefits in the total monthly Part B premium.

Most Part D plans require you to purchase prescription drug coverage to receive this additional Medicare drug benefit.

To learn more about how Medicare works, take a look at this Help to Save You Money video.

Federal Programs

Medicare, Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are not included in the Social Security benefits income and you will not receive any Social Security benefits if you receive this information.

Medicare Benefit:

Medicare currently has six benefits:

Premiums: An amount that helps cover costs of Medicare Part B premium and Part D premium for the rest of your life.

Out of Pocket Costs: To help pay the cost of Medicare Part A and Part B expenses.

Medicare Part A deductible

Out of pocket costs: To help pay the cost of Medicare Part B expenses and Part D prescription drug expenses.

Disability Insurance:

In general, an insurance company must cover your annual Social Security and Medicare Part B premium when you are not working or participating in a job training program for more than 30 days.

While this doesn’t mean you should be concerned about your future Medicare coverage, there are some specific situations you should be aware of. This includes children under 18 years of age who aren’t yet covered by Social Security and Medicare, as well as a spouse or domestic partner who is eligible for Medicare.

Federal Programs:

Tax Credits: Certain tax credits are available to lower the monthly cost of Medicare Part B and Part D.

To learn more about Medicare, visit http://www.medicare.gov.

Social Security Income:

Social Security pays benefits to disabled people and individuals who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or, if they were born on or after January 2, 1937, may be eligible for Social Security benefits. Social Security is the only source of income for some of the most vulnerable populations in the country including the disabled, the blind and elderly individuals with limited income. You can read about your Social Security benefits benefits, including how to get your benefit statements, at http://www.socialsecurity.gov.

To learn more about Social Security, visit http://www.socialsecurity.gov.

Supplemental Security Income:

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or, if you were born on or after January 2, 1937, may be eligible for Social Security benefits. Supplemental Security Income is designed to help some of the most vulnerable in our society, such as the blind and the elderly. You may be eligible for SSI if your gross income is below $16,157 in 2018.

To learn more about SSI, visit http://www.socialsecurity.gov.

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP):

SNAP is the only federal assistance program that provides food stamps to low-income households. Participants in SNAP may purchase eligible food items at participating retailers and may receive additional assistance to purchase additional food items, such as milk, cheese, eggs, whole grains and other nonperishable items, through the Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP).

To learn more about SNAP, visit http://www.fns.usda.gov.

Supplemental Medical Insurance (SIMI):

Forms of medical insurance that are provided to low-income individuals.

To learn more about Medicare, visit http://www.medicare.gov.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q. What is Medicare?

A. The federally sponsored healthcare program called Medicare is one of the largest payer of medical costs in the United States. All Americans are eligible to enroll and it’s a free program.

Q. What happens to my insurance if I enroll in Medicare?

A. Your insurance policy is no longer needed. But, if you have a plan that covers long-term care, your plan can stay in effect until you lose coverage, or switch to Medicare Advantage, which is a paid program within Medicare. The following types of Medicare Advantage plans may be offered in 2018: Medicare Advantage-Enrollment Program; Medicare Advantage-Advanced Directive (for beneficiaries who would like help in making medical decisions); Medicare Advantage-Enrollment Program & Advanced Directive (for beneficiaries who have certain health conditions and may not be able to participate in conventional Medicare); Medicare Advantage-Preferred Provider Organization (PPO); Medicare Advantage-Preferred Provider Organization (PPO); and Medicare Advantage-Regional Plan (SP).

Q. What about my medicare supplement insurance?

A. When you enroll in Medicare Part A (Medicare F), you will lose your supplement insurance. You will need to pay for Part A premiums and Part B premiums. For those who use Medicare Advantage plans, you may keep your supplement insurance policy. You will need to use it for medical expenses not covered by Part A.

Q. Can I still use my Medicare Supplement policy for Part A if I lose my Medicare Advantage plan?

A. You may keep your supplement insurance policy, but any unpaid Part A premium balance must be paid by you (the beneficiary). You can pay the balance of your unpaid Part A premiums in monthly installments or in one lump sum. You must pay a premium at the time you are disenrolled from your Medicare Advantage plan. This will mean that you can no longer use your Medicare Supplement insurance policy for Part A.

Q. Do I have to pay Part A premium surcharges in 2018?

A. There is no difference in Medicare surcharge for Part A in 2018 versus 2017. There is a 0.9 percent surcharge on Part A for beneficiaries who are 100 or older.

Q. How much do my Part A and Part B premiums go up in 2018?

A. If you are in the same year of eligibility as in 2017, you pay the same amount of Part A and Part B premiums as in 2017. If you are a new Medicare beneficiary in the same year of eligibility as in 2017, your monthly Part B premium will be higher in 2018. Part B premiums are based on your income and the projected cost of providing care under Medicare. If your income is below a certain level, your Part B premiums will be zero. If your income is above a certain level, you may pay a Part B premium surcharge. If your income is above a certain level, your Part B premium may be based on your average weekly wages. You are entitled to a $0.80 monthly deductible for each Part B premium.

Q. Can I still enroll in Part D if I lose my Medicare Advantage plan?

A. No. Enrollment in Medicare Part D, the prescription drug benefit, will be prohibited for you. If you already enrolled in a Medicare Part D drug plan, you cannot enroll in a different Part D drug plan during the 2018 Medicare enrollment period. You will lose Part D coverage if you don’t have a plan to switch to and you lose your Medicare Advantage plan.

Q. Can I switch to a Medicare Advantage plan if I lose my Medicare Advantage plan?

A. Yes, you can. You can switch to a Medicare Advantage plan through the Special Enrollment Period (SEP), which is Dec. 31, 2017. If you did not enroll during the SEP, you will be automatically enrolled in a new Medicare Advantage plan if your current Medicare Advantage plan ends. You can visit the Medicare.gov/manage-advantage page for details on how to apply to switch to another Medicare Advantage plan.

Q. What if I lose my Medicare Advantage plan and can’t find a new one?

A. You will need to choose between “dual-eligible” (covered by Medicare Part A and Part B) and “bare-bone” (covered only by Part A) Medicare plans. In some cases, when Part B and Part D premiums and expenses are similar to a particular Medicare Advantage plan, a Medicare Advantage plan with similar costs is considered “dual-eligible.”

Q. How will cost-sharing for Part A and Part B change in 2018?

A. Effective Jan. 1, 2018, Medicare Part A and Part B monthly premiums will increase by an average of $1.50 a month. The Part A and Part B beneficiary share of the hospital and skilled nursing facility charges will increase by an average of $24 a month.

Also effective Jan. 1, 2018, Medicare Part B will have a deductible of $183 in 2018, the same amount as in 2017.

Other changes in Part B include the following:

Beginning in 2018, most beneficiaries will pay a monthly deductible of $187 for Part B.

Medicare beneficiaries who need a skilled nursing facility stay longer than 30 days will have to pay a 20 percent share of the facility costs, up from the current 10 percent.

For beneficiaries who need a long-term care facility stay longer than a year, the share of the facility costs will increase from 20 percent to 30 percent.

These new payment amounts will be phased in over several years for most beneficiaries.

Q. What happens if I have a Medicare Advantage plan with a prescription drug plan?

A. Your Medicare Advantage plan can also be a prescription drug plan for people covered by other Medicare Advantage plans, if your current plan doesn’t offer a prescription drug plan. In that case, you would pay an average of $8.40 a month more for your Part D premium.

Medicare Part D also can be a stand-alone prescription drug plan. To be a stand-alone prescription drug plan, you must enroll in Medicare Parts A and B. However, this plan will not cover the costs of drugs under your

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